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2015 Nominee
Voted 18 out of 20

Our Rights: How Kids are Changing the World

By Janet Wilson. Published in 2013 by Second Story Press

A girl who spoke out against her government for the rights of aboriginal children, a boy who walked across his country to raise awareness of homelessness, and a former child soldier who wants to make music not war. Here are true stories of kids just like you who are standing up for their rights. Read about how they have made a difference. Dylan Mahalingam from the USA started an online charity to raise money to fight child poverty. The bravery of Nujood Ali Mohammed from Yemen inspired other girls who were being forced to marry too young. Anita Khushwaha from India became a beekeeper to pay for school, even though it was considered a job only men could do. All of them are making a difference for children’s rights.

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3 thoughts on “Our Rights: How Kids are Changing the World

  1. Hillhurst school

    RMBA Book review-Our Rights

    This book is all about the rights of children and how they are denied in parts of the world. For instance, when the girl wanted a divorce with her husband because she thought that she was to young and wanted to wait until she found love herself. I find this RMBA very interesting and so should you. I think that all grade 4 and 5s should read this to realize children’s rights could be denied or rejected and kids our age go through this everyday.
    So, in my opinion you definitely read this book it may make you sad and happy. I know nobody wants more work, not even I do. But when we have to, this is a great idea thank you to who ever came up with it.
    I do say you should vote for this book because it has a great point and is very fascinating on all the stories and described how every person felt like a person or not. I hope you all will vote for this book or at least read it and think about what’s happening.
    Okay if I have not made this clear enough every grade 4 and 5 should definitely read this book. Please vote for it just read it and enjoy this book.

    Reply
  2. Hillhurst school

    Book Review of “Our Rights”
    Elysia Price
    The RMBA book “Our Rights”, written and illustrated by Janet Wilson, describes children who are changing the world and how we can help too. The book starts with a summary list of children’s rights as defined by the United Nations. It then describes 12 cases of different children that have helped make a change for the betterment of children around the world. The book then concludes with several pages describing how the reader can help to make a difference.
    I believe that it is very possible for children like us to make a significant change in the world. Before I read this book I knew from our class discussions that some children had managed to make some improvements but I didn’t expect the improvements could be really that significant.
    I really like the case story regarding Nujood Ali from Yemen. It describes how she was force to marry a much older man when she was 10 years old. Her husband mistreated and abused her. She was brave enough to go to court and convince the judge to grant her a divorce. Inspired by her bravery, other girls came forward to sue for divorce. Nujood then wrote a book, I am Nujood, aged 10 and divorced. The case describes that she wants to be become a lawyer and help other girls in Yemen. I found this case to be very significant in my mind because Nujood didn’t stop after being granted the divorce but then went on to write a book and plans to devote her life to helping other girls that are in the same position she was.
    Another inspiring case describes the story of Anita Khushwaha, a girl born into a lower caste society in India where she was expected to spend her life shepherding goats, marrying young and having many children. I think Anita made a number of significant changes. At age 6, she persuaded her parents to let her go to school and paid the school fees by tutoring other children and running errands for bee keepers. At 15, Anita refused to be married and pretended to go on a hunger strike until her parents gave in. She then did the un-thinkable – she followed her dream to become a beekeeper – a job traditionally only done by men. After her beekeeping business grew to be very large and profitable – people respected her. She then bought a bike and enrolled in college. She became a role model for millions of girls across India.
    A final example of change regards Cheryl Perera who was born in Canada but successfully helped many exploited children in Sri Lanka by helping a found non-profit organization to stop commercial exploitation of children and providing homes and counselling for survivors – when she was just in grade 10. This Canadian girl, who had never faced such terrible problems herself, was, after meeting some exploited children in Sri Lanka, motivated enough to make the effort to help children on the other side of the world. I found this very inspiring as it showed me that I could actually make a real difference to make a significant change elsewhere in the world.
    The book, “Our Rights”, as described through the examples above, show that it is very possible for children like us to make significant change in the world. This book is well written and objectively presents each of the cases to the reader. I found this book superior to other children’s rights books I have read because it presents many different true case stories rather than a novel format. I also like the fact that each case story included a picture of the child which helped me identify with them and their situation. I would definitely recommend this book to other readers as it has many inspiring true stories and provides a good summary on how each of us can make a difference to create change for millions of children around the world.

    i will definitely vote for this book- Elysia

    Reply
  3. Hillhurst school

    Book Review of “Our Rights”
    Elysia Price
    The RMBA book “Our Rights”, written and illustrated by Janet Wilson, describes children who are changing the world and how we can help too. The book starts with a summary list of children’s rights as defined by the United Nations. It then describes 12 cases of different children that have helped make a change for the betterment of children around the world. The book then concludes with several pages describing how the reader can help to make a difference.
    I believe that it is very possible for children like us to make a significant change in the world. Before I read this book I knew from our class discussions that some children had managed to make some improvements but I didn’t expect the improvements could be really that significant.
    I really like the case story regarding Nujood Ali from Yemen. It describes how she was force to marry a much older man when she was 10 years old. Her husband mistreated and abused her. She was brave enough to go to court and convince the judge to grant her a divorce. Inspired by her bravery, other girls came forward to sue for divorce. Nujood then wrote a book, I am Nujood, aged 10 and divorced. The case describes that she wants to be become a lawyer and help other girls in Yemen. I found this case to be very significant in my mind because Nujood didn’t stop after being granted the divorce but then went on to write a book and plans to devote her life to helping other girls that are in the same position she was.
    Another inspiring case describes the story of Anita Khushwaha, a girl born into a lower caste society in India where she was expected to spend her life shepherding goats, marrying young and having many children. I think Anita made a number of significant changes. At age 6, she persuaded her parents to let her go to school and paid the school fees by tutoring other children and running errands for bee keepers. At 15, Anita refused to be married and pretended to go on a hunger strike until her parents gave in. She then did the un-thinkable – she followed her dream to become a beekeeper – a job traditionally only done by men. After her beekeeping business grew to be very large and profitable – people respected her. She then bought a bike and enrolled in college. She became a role model for millions of girls across India.
    A final example of change regards Cheryl Perera who was born in Canada but successfully helped many exploited children in Sri Lanka by helping a found non-profit organization to stop commercial exploitation of children and providing homes and counselling for survivors – when she was just in grade 10. This Canadian girl, who had never faced such terrible problems herself, was, after meeting some exploited children in Sri Lanka, motivated enough to make the effort to help children on the other side of the world. I found this very inspiring as it showed me that I could actually make a real difference to make a significant change elsewhere in the world.
    The book, “Our Rights”, as described through the examples above, show that it is very possible for children like us to make significant change in the world. This book is well written and objectively presents each of the cases to the reader. I found this book superior to other children’s rights books I have read because it presents many different true case stories rather than a novel format. I also like the fact that each case story included a picture of the child which helped me identify with them and their situation. I would definitely recommend this book to other readers as it has many inspiring true stories and provides a good summary on how each of us can make a difference to create change for millions of children around the world.

    I would definitely vote for this book – Elysia

    Reply

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